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Hi folks. Greeting from Bulgaria. I got this E-pace a month ago for my stubborn wife. As long as she is using it for very short distances I realised the harm which that could arise. I read a lot of staff and just suggest here that we could help each other with experience and knowhow in preventing clogging of exhaust system. Is there a good practice how to prevent that happened. I think if once per week one drives the car for 20-30 min with higher speed or may be using on regular base a DPF cleanser or something esle??? Please let us know if some of you had a good results. Thanks in advance.
 

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Taking her for a blast once a week is a good idea, (The car I mean). Using good quality Diesel fuel. I avoid supermarket fuel. Depending on model of your
e-pace, use sport mode often which I find holds lower gears longer hence a slightly higher revving engine, helps if there is a regen. taking place.
Good luck with her.
Pete
 

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Hi. Unfortunately there is no simple solution to DPF issues. The only thing that will reduce build up in the DPF is an active regeneration, a blast up the motorway is not an active regeneration but a passive regeneration. A passive regeneration will only reduce soot levels minimally and on its own will not keep the filter clear. To keep the filter clear active regenerations are carried out at when the filter is almost fully blocked , if successfull then soot levels will always return to acceptable levels. Failed active regenerations will lead to oil dilution which is yet another problem! I have a gadget plugged into the OBD2 which tells me by way of pressure differentials across the DPF when an active regeneration is about to take place and then monitors the increased temperatures that enable an active regeneration to complete. Without this information it is impossible to know when an active regeneration is due and avoid a failed regeneration.
Good luck with your ePace. Gary.
 

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The gadget is just a OBD2 Bluetooth scanner. Plenty on eBay for £5 up to £100's the one I use was £20. Download a OBD2 app and just set up a dashboard to display what ever you want. This bit of kit only shows what's going on under the bonnet and does not allow any changes to the ecu. I have set it up to continuously display exhaust temperatures, regeneration type indication and pressure differential counter. When you open the app it connects automatically and displays the dashboard you have set up. The phone does all its usual stuff but continuously displays the dashboard. You can see the effect your driving style has on the dpf and also you will see that a weekly blast up the motorway has no effect unless it coincides with an active regeneration. Outside of the workshop there is no way you can force an active regeneration just by blasting up the motorway. I have collated quite a bit of information on this and it does not tie in with what I am being told by the people at my dealership. Any questions or input greatfully accepted.
Gary.
 

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very interesting, thanks guys, Didn't like the idea of driving with some bulky device and cable flapping around my left foot but this looks good as it's a dongle and app
 

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Hi, just a word of warning. This DA Dongle is a good bit of kit but it is a totally different tool. It is designed to be used by mechanics to carry out repeated forced regenerations to clear dpf's, it gives no indication of when a regeneration is required. Using this when you don't need a regeneration will only lead to the other problem ,oil dilution!
Gary.
 

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Hi, having driven my ePace for 6 months and 10,000 miles with an OBD2 connected I would like to offer a few views and observations.
1. The intervals between active regenerations vary between 140 and 320 miles depending on types of driving.
2. Passive regenerations have no effect at all on reducing deposits although the soot levels build up at a much slower rate.
3. Active regenerations will start at any point and continue even if the car is stationary with the engine running.
4. Noxious smells do enter the passenger compartment when the car is carrying out an active regeneration whilst stationary.
5. An active regeneration only last's between 5 and 15 miles.
6. I have only had one failed regeneration throughout this time and that was purely my fault for parking and turning off the engine mid regeneration. On restarting the car it initiated another active regeneration and completed it ok.
7. I suspect that the amber dpf warning light only comes on after numerous failed regenerations.
8. I realise that with the amber warning light on a blast up the motorway is probably a good idea until the warning light switches off. But I cannot understand why dealerships and some posters on here recommend a regular blast in the car. Unless this coincides with an active regeneration it will have no effect and it just a waste of time and fuel. Due to the intervals between regenerations varying there is no guarantee that you actually do a regeneration on your blast!!
Thoughts please?
 

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That's really helpful. I've read a lot of good advice on this forum about the workings of DPF but nothing that explains the actual regeneration process as clearly as this
 
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