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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone gone for the life shine paint protection? I've noticed my dealership offers it and it's some sort of treatment they give the vehicle glass paint and interior to help protect it but I can't gather any other info as to what it really does so can't decide if it's worth it, anyone know what it is or had it done themselves?
 

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We will be having Ceramic Coating put on the car the end of the month -We had it on the last couple of cars , it's certainly more expensive than dealer treatments - but the time spent on the car is an order of magnitude greater. Car will be away for a week.

It's not for everybody , there's not so much wrong with the products used by dealers it's just the level of preparation is not to the standard of a professional detailer.
 
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I had the GardX paint protection put on my car from new and I am more than happy. I just rinse the car with a brush and water every couple of weeks and each month give it a proper wash using their shampoo and conserver.

The dirt does't stick as badly as other cars and doesn't streak .

There is also a leather cleaner that makes the seats really clean every so often.

Not sure of the cost as it was "integrated" into the total cost of the car with discounts etc.
 

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My E-Pace was coated with AGlaze by my dealer and it is excellent. As has been stated I just wash it with a brush and water and it comes up at treat. It saves so much time and effort and is a pleasure to clean the car.
I've used similar products on my BMWs and Merc and recommend it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sounds like there's a lot of options and I will look into them, I think we can all agree there's are cheaper options than dealership doing it and for seemingly the same or better result, thanks for your replies
 

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alp said:
My E-Pace was coated with AGlaze by my dealer and it is excellent. As has been stated I just wash it with a brush and water and it comes up at treat. It saves so much time and effort and is a pleasure to clean the car.
I've used similar products on my BMWs and Merc and recommend it.
Please don't wash it with a brush. No AGlaze or indeed Ceramic coating can withstand the damage from them.

I would suggest that most dealer applied coating will be poor as the valeters do not have the time to full correct the paint beforehand. ceramic coatings need professional or experienced enthusiast with a machine to correct the paint beforehand as once a glass coating is put on it's not coming off without machine polishing it off.

The car still needs a proper wash technique regardless of the coating/ wax used which can be easily researched on YouTube. I don't want to go on and on so will leave it at that..
 

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First off I spray the car with Bilthamber Autofoam using a pressure sprayer or snow foam lance, the after 5 min power wash it off. That should remove the majority of grime an stuck on dirt. Then I hand wash it using a bucket with a grit guard and a second filled with water to rinse out the soft mitt I use. Use straight lines and don't scrubb the paint. I don't use wash and wax shampoo only a ph neutral wax safe one such as Meguilars NXT or Bilt Hanber shampoo as they are slick and leave no film behind. Then I rinse using an open hose to sheet the water off. New bucket with dedicated soft tools and the same shampoo for the wheels.

Next up I use a Metrovac Sidekick dryer to blow out water from all the cracks such as rear tailgate and also the wheels, finally I use a thick microfibre drying towel to pat dry the rest of the car as rubbing can cause swirls when working outside. If time allows I'll top up with a spray detailer or wax.

I machine polished mine when I got it and coated it with Meguilars ultimate liquid wax albeit I like trying new products all the time. I top it up with their ultimate spray wax which takes around 15 mins tops.

I have been brief on the above. To sum up the most likely damage from swirls comes from poor wash and drying technique. There is little point paying a pro to detail your car, only for you to swirl it at your first wash by not using the correct method. YouTube has tons on the detailing subject.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You've been very helpful and definitely given me and I'm sure a few others a good few tips to consider I'll get on YouTube and see what I can dig up but from what I gather it's quality products and good technique to aim for.
 

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Pwood said:
First off I spray the car with Bilthamber Autofoam using a pressure sprayer or snow foam lance, the after 5 min power wash it off. That should remove the majority of grime an stuck on dirt. Then I hand wash it using a bucket with a grit guard and a second filled with water to rinse out the soft mitt I use. Use straight lines and don't scrubb the paint. I don't use wash and wax shampoo only a ph neutral wax safe one such as Meguilars NXT or Bilt Hanber shampoo as they are slick and leave no film behind. Then I rinse using an open hose to sheet the water off. New bucket with dedicated soft tools and the same shampoo for the wheels.

Next up I use a Metrovac Sidekick dryer to blow out water from all the cracks such as rear tailgate and also the wheels, finally I use a thick microfibre drying towel to pat dry the rest of the car as rubbing can cause swirls when working outside. If time allows I'll top up with a spray detailer or wax.

I machine polished mine when I got it and coated it with Meguilars ultimate liquid wax albeit I like trying new products all the time. I top it up with their ultimate spray wax which takes around 15 mins tops.

I have been brief on the above. To sum up the most likely damage from swirls comes from poor wash and drying technique. There is little point paying a pro to detail your car, only for you to swirl it at your first wash by not using the correct method. YouTube has tons on the detailing subject.
So don't use a brush like this Hozelock, even with soft bristles?
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B000TAUFHO/ref=emc_b_5_t
 

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No wash brushes are paint safe. I appreciate the roof is a challenge for a lot of you so I can recommend one pole type brush pad, purely due to the company's reputation amongst detailing enthusiasts. https://www.polishedbliss.co.uk/microfiber-madness-incredipole I use their drying towels and they are superb.

There is a lot of poor videos on YouTube so maybe start with Ammo as it contains videos for all levels. He uses their products but I think the advice is sound and he explains the reasons behind it.
 

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Jagster said:
You've been very helpful and definitely given me and I'm sure a few others a good few tips to consider I'll get on YouTube and see what I can dig up but from what I gather it's quality products and good technique to aim for.
Totally. The more dirt you can remove with the pre wash the less chance you have of adding micro swirls. Start by washing the windows, then the roof and work your way down using straight lines and don't keep going over the same panel one pass is enough. The reason for straight lines as apposed to circular motions is that despite all the care in the world swirls can still occur and using straight lines avoids the SPIDER WEB effect you see on most cars in direct sunlight especially dark ones.

If you have gloss black wheels then use wool wheel brushes such as Wheel Woolies as the paint scratches pretty badly with a cheap wheel brush. I have an S model and the spokes are tight so use one of these for the insides and a small mitt for the facingshttps://www.cleanyourcar.co.uk/ez-detail-brush-mini . Also don't use acidic wheel cleaners look for the newer types but still only use them if you have to.

Warning this detailing lark is addictive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Haha I can almost feel the obsession growing there's a lot to take in but it seems definately worth it to protect your investment I now shudder at the thought of all the roadside car wash businesses at garages around the country just braisenly swirling old dirty mits all over our cars :eek: :shock: :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Can I ask you or anyone else about clay bars? Have you ever used them or do you use them? I've also seen liquid clay bars aswell, there's just so much out there it can be difficult to see the line between a worthwhile purchase and a waste of money
 

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Jagster said:
Can I ask you or anyone else about clay bars? Have you ever used them or do you use them? I've also seen liquid clay bars aswell, there's just so much out there it can be difficult to see the line between a worthwhile purchase and a waste of money
The theory behind clay bars is to remove bonded contaminants and yes they work but you will cause some micromarring especially if the car is heavily contaminated. I am not a fan unless I really have to since the advent of fallout removers.

Most of the gritty feel you get on the paint even after washing is iron contamination from brake dust, railways and industry. Products such as Bilthamber Korrosol or CARPRO IRON X once sprayed on will dissolve the iron without harming your paint and in doing so leave it smooth after pressure washing it off.

I have a white Epace and it was the first thing I did after I got my car (dealer was told to remove the covers and basic pressure wash no prep). After spraying the car it bleed purple like you would not believe which is the produce dissolving the deposits. I was surprise just how much my car blend until I remembered it came from Austria and was lying in a compound in England for a while I expect. After that I wiped the car down with tar remover and felt no need to clay it.


Don't get me wrong claying works just be aware that you will need an abrasive polish afterwards which you would do anyway or why bother. It's easy but needs extreme care. Clay mitts are easier but most agree they are more prone to marring .
 
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